Sunday, Apr 3rd, 2011

Ehhh—Crawford's Up, Doc!

In case you missed Dean's announcement in his interview at Previewsworld.com, Crawford is a one-shot due for release later in 2011, a book I'm especially thrilled to have in our lineup. If you're asking, "What is it, a Crawford?", a better question would be, "Whose brainchild is Crawford?" Because the answer to that is, "Chuck Jones," and if you're like me, that's sure to make you smile.

Crawford1

Though in my twenties I grew to enjoy Floyd Gottfredson's Mickey Mouse and Carl Barks's Donald Duck and Uncle $crooge, as a boy I pooh-poohed all things Disney - I was strictly a Looney Tunes kinda guy. Not for me The Wonderful World of Disney with its airings Herbie the Love Bug, Professor Ludwig von Drake, and Charlie, the Ding-a-ling Lynx. I was all about The Bugs Bunny Show and the Warner Brothers characters, led by the wascawwy wabbit himself. It was guaranteed laughs whenever Bugs appeared in shorts like "Long-Haired Hare," "Duck! Rabbit! Duck!", "Beanstalk Bunny," or "Bully for Bugs." As I grew older and began reading the material on hand in the 1970s about Warners animation, I learned all the cartoons named were directed by the same talented individual, one Charles M. "Chuck" Jones.

Crawford2

 Jones's earliest work as a director was considered "cute" and slow-moving by his peers at the studio; his pacing quickly improved, but in his artwork there was always a rounded, curvy cuteness to the line. Long before manga and anime entrenched itself on American shores, Chuck Jones was drawing big-eyed kid characters in everything from his aborted Road Runner TV pilot to Cindy Lou Who from 1966's How the Grinch Stole Christmas.

The trademark Jones cuteness is on display in Crawford, as well - and that's hardly a bad thing. Jones filters his stories through a kid's perspective, which includes flights of both whimsy and fancy while running an emotional gamut that will resonate to everyone who grew up as the neighborhood maverick, running against the herd.

Crawford_sunday

Dean's co-editor on Crawford is Kurtis Findlay, who conceived the project and has been researching this "Unknown Chuck Jones" project for the past couple of years. We're working with Marian Jones, Chuck's widow, on the project, and all art is © the Chuck Jones Estate. We'll have more on Crawford for you as its publication date draws near. In the meantime, why do I have a sudden urge to watch "The Rabbit of Seville" again ... ?

canwellposted by Bruce Canwell