Thursday, Feb 13th, 2014

Bungle Me This!

Dean Mullaney posted by Dean Mullaney

Bungle5

In his Introduction to the upcoming LOAC Essentials Vol. 5, comics historian Paul Tumey writes of Harry J. Tuthill's comic strip:

"The Bungle Family offers no daily punch-line or slapstick pratfall typical of a humorous American comic strip from the 1920s and 1930s—just a slow, steady boil. The strip is populated with decidedly non-heroic characters who are greedy, gossipy, and grouchy—the sort of people one might cross the street to avoid. George and Josephine Bungle are perpetually involved in a seemingly endless succession of small-minded squabbles, punctuated with shameless scrambles for the riches and status that would allow them to claw their way up from their lower middle class purgatory. George Bungle apparently never met a neighbor with whom he couldn't start a feud, a wealthy relative who didn't captivate him, or a new business idea he wasn't convinced would let him 'put one over on Wall Street.'"

It's one of those strips that can't be sampled by one or two dailies in a History of Comics compendium. When we finally added long stretches of the strip to the Library's collection, I sat down to read them and—oh, my—was I hooked. I've never read anything like it. The Bungle Family may be obscure but it's certainly a strip that is essential reading. We hope you give it a try when it's released in early summer.

Here's where the book begins (click on strips for a larger image)…

Bungle1

Bungle2