Dick TracyDick Tracy introduced violence — blunt, ironic, and retributional violence — to the comics page. The quintissential Dick Tracy line about his crimefighting tactics? “I’m going to shoot first and investigate later!” The strip is also notable for its introduction of scientific detection to comics, a theme that Gould continued to exploit well into the 1960s. And now, nearly 80 years after the first Tracy strips, Gould's massive body of work is being collected in its entirety.

    Dick Tracy 80th Anniversary Collection!

    by Chester Gould

    Highlights from Dick Tracy's long and storied career, as chosen by comics historian and writer Jay Maeder. This 144-page trade paperback contains the Best of the Best sequences from the 1930s through the 1970s, and is a great introduction to the character for new readers and old ones alike. Featuring villains such as Doc Hump, The Blank, B.B. Eyes, Flattop, The Brow, Shaky, Mumbles, T.V. Wiggles, Model, Rughead, and Flattop Jr.!


    8.5" x 11" trade paperback, 144 pp., $19.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-60010-671-2.

     

    Dick Tracy Vol. 1: 1931-1933

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Ted Adams, Ashley Wood & Robbie Robbins. Introduction by Max Allan Collins.

    Introducing the lone square-jawed hero who holds the line against against the underworld. Meet Dick Tracy, his girlfriend Tess Trueheart, Chief Brandon, and Detective Pat Patton as they fight it out with gangsters such as Big Boy, Stooge Viller, Larceny Lu, and grifter Steve the Tramp, who's enslaved a young boy named "Junior" to be his criminal accomplice.

    9.5" x 7" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 364 pp., $29.99. ISBN: 978-1-60010-036-8.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 2: 1933-1935

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Ted Adams, Ashley Wood & Robbie Robbins. Introduction by Max Allan Collins.

    Tracy frees Junior from Steve the Tramp's clutches, but who are the boy's real parents? Plus the return of Big Boy, Stooge Viller, and Larceny Lu, and new villains Doc Hump and Boris Arson. And if that wasn't enough, what does Tess think about the new love interest in Dick's life?

    9.5" x 7" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 380 pp., $29.99. ISBN: 978-1-60010-037-6.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 3: 1935-1936

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Ted Adams, Ashley Wood & Robbie Robbins. Introduction by Max Allan Collins.

    Tess is kidnapped (again!), while Tracy chases Boris Arson and his sister Zora, Cutie Diamond, and the Famon brothers and their manipulating Ma. We also meet cute-as-a-button Toby Townly, who may turn out to be an extortionist, and undercover G-man Jim Trailer!

    9.5" x 7" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 352 pp., $29.99. ISBN: 978-1-60010-038-3.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 4: 1936-1938

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Ted Adams, Ashley Wood & Robbie Robbins. Introduction by Max Allan Collins.

    Tracy tries to rehabilitate mobster "Lips" Manlis, comes afoul of gum moll Mimi, crosses paths with The Purple Cross Gang, whose members must tatoo crosses on their tongues, and faces the first of Chester Gould's memorable grotesque villians - the Blank, the man with no face!

    9.5" x 7" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 344 pp., $29.99. ISBN: 978-1-60010-039-0.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 5: 1938-1939

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Ted Adams, Ashley Wood & Robbie Robbins. Introduction by Max Allan Collins.

    "We'll be be wading in blood before we lick this outfit," Tracy says of Stud Bronzen's alien smuggling operation. Violence begats violence as Tracy battles the decadent JoJo Nidle, the vicious Scardol, and if that wasn't enough, Tracy is blinded in a poison gas factory explosion while fighting Karpse.

    9.5" x 7" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 320 pp., $29.99. ISBN: 978-1-60010-201-1.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 6: 1939-1941

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Ted Adams, Ashley Wood & Robbie Robbins. Introduction by Max Allan Collins.

    Tess Truehart finally gets her wish as her wedding day is here…but not to Dick Tracy! Meanwhile, Tracy fights the strange team of midget Jerome and Big Mamma, the ingenious inventor Black Pearl, the fake mystic Yogee Yamma, and the bloodthirsty murderer Krome. Plus, the mysterious Mary X, an abandoned baby, and the return of Toby Townly!

    9.5” x 7” hardcover-with-dustjacket, 346 pp., $29.99. ISBN: 978-1-60010-283-7.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 7: 1941-42

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Max Allan Collins, Historical Essay by Jeff Kersten.

    Tracy faces the Jewel thief/murderer Littleface, Krome, the inimitable Mole, wartime trafficker B.B. Eyes, and the pianist/murderer 88 Keys. Contains all daily and Sunday strips from January, 1941 through September, 1942.

    Oversized 11” x 8.5” hardcover-with-dustjacket, 288 pp., $39.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-60010-395-7.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 8: 1942-44

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Max Allan Collins, Historical Essay by Jeff Kersten.

    Chester Gould hits his stride, as, in quick succession, he introduces four of his most grotesque villains: Pruneface, Laffy, Mrs. Pruneface, and Flattop! All while Dick Tracy is subjected to one of the most inventive and bizarre death traps in comics history. Containing all daily and Sunday comic strips from September, 1942 through March, 1944.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 266 pp, $39.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-60010-463-3.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 9: 1944-45

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Max Allan Collins, Historical Essay by Jeff Kersten.

    Chester Gould's fertile imagination continues at a breakneck pace, featuring Flattop, The Brow, Shaky, Breathless Mahoney, Measles, Gravel Gertie, B.O. Plenty, and the Summer Sisters!  With a special feature about the radio program "Dick Tracy in B-Flat," starring Bing Crosby, Dinah Shore, Frank Sinatra, and Jimmy Durante. Contains all strips from March 1944 through September 1945.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 266 pp, $39.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-60010-532-6.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 10: 1945-47

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Max Allan Collins, Historical Essay by Jeff Kersten.

    Calling all law-abiding citizens — witness the introduction of the famous Two-Way Wrist Radio, created by the aptly-named Brilliant! Enjoy an ever-expanding cast that includes Diet Smith, Themesong, and Christmas Early, as well as the return of Vitamin Flintheart and Snowflake, while the two most unlikely characters get married! Thrill to the capers staged by the villains Influence, Shoulders, Itchy, Nilon Hose, and Gargles! Containing all daily and Sunday comic strips from September 1945 through March 1947.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 266 pp, $39.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-60010-578-4.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 11: 1947-48

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Max Allan Collins, Historical Essay by Jeff Kersten.

    This volume introduces Mumbles—one of Dick Tracy's greatest villains—and sees Tracy form the Crime Stoppers Club, teaching young boys and girls crime detection techniques. The fascinating (and sometimes grotesque) parade of characters continues, including Coffyhead, Hypo, Bronko, Kiss Andtell, Acres O'Riley, Heels Beals, and Autumn Hews. Plus, everyone dreads seeing what the baby born to B.O. Plenty and Gravel Gertie will look like! Containing all daily and Sunday comic strips from March 17, 1947 through September 26, 1948.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 266 pp, $39.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-60010-579-1.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 12: 1948-50

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Max Allan Collins, Historical Essay by Jeff Kersten.

    Major changes to the regular cast. What happens to Brilliant that causes Chief Brandon to step down? Wait ’til you see who’s the new Chief! Then, Sam Catchem joins the force, Sparkle Plenty charms everyone, and two major characters tie the knot! And the villains? Well, Chester Gould continues to invent one grotesque, evil bad guy after another, as Wormy,  Pearshape, Big Frost, Sleet, Talcum Freely, Sketch Paree, and Mousey make life miserable for Tracy and company. Containing all daily and Sunday comic strips from September 27, 1948 through March 25, 1950. Plus, the never-before reprinted "Black Bag Mystery"—a color daily whodunnit separate from the regular continuity!

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 276 pp, $39.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-61377-057-3.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 13: 1950-1951

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Max Allan Collins, Historical Essay by Jeff Kersten.

    Dick and Tess's house fire-bombed! B.O. Plenty riddled with bullets! Sam Catchum apparently crushed to death! This volume's villains include the bombastic Blowtop, T.V. Wiggles, Dr. Plain, and Empty Williams. Plus a baby named Bonny Braids is born, Vitamin Flintheart returns, and who's the mysterious woman named Crewy Lou? Containing all strips from March 26, 1950  to September 15, 1951.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 252 pp, $39.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-61377-198-3.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 14: 1951-1953

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Max Allan Collins, Historical Essay by Jeff Kersten.

    What does Crewy Lou do with Bonny Braids? Dick and Tess’s baby isn’t the only child in danger in Volume 14: wait ‘til you meet Sparkle Plenty’s new best friend, “Little Wings,” and discover the ominous reason she appears to glow in the dark! Chester Gould also ramps up the violence and death traps, introduces more inventions (closed circuit surveillance, the first broadcast police line-up), and more cra-a-zy characters such as Tonsils, Dot View, Mr. Crime, Odds Zonn, Newsuit Nan, and Spinner ReCord, plus the touching story of the girl known as Model. Including all strips from September 16, 1951 - April 18, 1953.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 256 pp, $39.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-61377-507-3.

    Dick Tracy Vol. 15: 1953-1954

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Max Allan Collins.

    In Volume Fifteen, reprinting all daily and Sunday comic strips from April 19, 1953 to October 24, 1954, we learn the fate of "Little Wings" and her radioactive dad. On a lighter side, we meet Canhead (B.O.'s brother, Kincaid Plenty); his not so light and not so nice ex-wife Pony; and her crony, the downright creepy 3-D Magee. Meanwhile, Tracy has to deal with TNT vests and killer ants while showing Open-Mind Monty that he's no "dummy." Plus, the unlikely duo of Dewdrop and Sticks, the oversized Rainbow Reiley, and Chester Gould's latest and greatest grotesque: Rughead.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 256 pp, $39.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-61377-668-1.

    New Release

    Dick Tracy Vol. 16: 1954-1956

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Max Allan Collins, Historical Essay by Jeff Kersten.

    In Volume Sixteen—reprinting strips from October 25, 1954 through May 13, 1956—Chester Gould presents an amazing number of memorable characters: grotesques such as the murderous Rughead and a 467-lb. killer named Oodles, health faddist George Ozone and his wild boys named Neki and Hokey, the despicable "Nothing" Yonson, the amoral teenager Joe Period, and introduces nightclub photog-turned policewoman Lizz,. Plus for the first time Gould brings back an old villain: Mumbles, who was thought drowned in 1947. And finally, he introduces what may be his most mature story of the 1950s—starring none other than Flattop Jr.!

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 276 pp, $39.99

    Coming Soon

    Dick Tracy Vol. 17: 1956-1957

    by Chester Gould
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Max Allan Collins, Historical Essay by Jeff Kersten.

    Dick Tracy celebrates its 25th anniversary as Chester Gould ups the ante in his assault on juvenile delinquency in the startling—and literally haunting—conclusion to the Flattop Jr. saga. Meanwhile, the squad room becomes co-ed when Lizz permanently joins the cast. Money remains the motivating factor for a new host of crazed villains, including the gymnastic murderesses, the Kitten Sisters; killer con men, the Clipso Brothers; two different spouse slayers; a notorious counterfeiter; and a “blind” drug pusher. Gould interposes some comedic relief—the return of bandleader Spike Dyke and the introduction of Morin Plenty (B.O.’s 88-year-old father) and his sugar-addicted wife Blossom—but humorous interludes are short-lived. Tragedy rules the day in Volume Seventeen, reprinting strips from May 14, 1956 through December 14, 1957.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 276 pp, $39.99.

Gould

The son of a newspaperman, Chester Gould was born in Pawnee, Oklahoma in 1900. He produced the cartoons Fillum Fables and The Girlfriends before creating “Plainsclothes Tracy” — changed to “Dick Tracy” — in 1931, and continued as its mastermind for an astonishing 46 years, until his retirement in 1977.


"One of the best things to happen to the comic market in the last few years was IDW's decision to publish The Complete Chester Gould's Dick Tracy."
-Scoop

"Chester Gould introduced a new hard-hitting type of realism [that] marked a radical and historic departure: the comics were no longer just funny."
-Jerry Robinson, The Comics

"Chester Gould's paragon of avenging normalcy was not your average, tough-guy detective. A unique combination of brawn and brains, he prefigured a whole new breed of scientific sleuths, whose recourse to technical innovations in criminology gave them the edge on grifters and hoods."
- Robert Storr, Dean, Yale University School of Art
(from Masters of American Comics)

"The Dick Tracy strip was one of the most popular, influential comics of the 20th Century. Young boys in particular were attracted to Chester Gould's crafty mix of violence, humor and melodrama. I know, because I was one of them."
-Max Allan Collins

"This black and white morality play of Good vs. Evil was famously haunted by its gallery of grotesque and aptly named villains like Mumbles, the Brow and Flattop. Each of their faces was literally a "map," a map of hell, indicated by the most peculiar configuration of lines the artist could manage. What great cartooning...it's time to build new bookshelves to welcome one of America's singular artistic achievements."
-art spiegelman