RipKirbyThe Complete Rip Kirby is the first comprehensive archival collection of Alex Raymond's post-war, post-modern classic. Created by Raymond in 1946, it was a fresh approach to the crime genre, an about-face from the prevailing hard-boiled style of detective fiction. Rip Kirby was smart and sophisticated, but still a man's man. He often applied scientific methods to his crime-solving techniques, but was still involved in plenty of action-Kirby was an All-American athlete and decorated war hero. The supporting cast featured Desmond, Rip's valet and assistant, and plenty of breathtaking women, particularly Rip's girlfriend, Honey Dorian, and the raven-haired and aptly-named Pagan Lee. Highly conscious of the fashions of the day, Raymond also brought post-war and early-'50s chic to the comics page. When Raymond tragically died in a car accident in 1956, John Prentice began drawing the strip and continued it for the next forty-three years.

    Rip Kirby Vol. 1: 1946-1948

    by Alex Raymond,
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney, Essay by Brian Walker Introduction by Tom Roberts.

    2010 HARVEY AWARD NOMINEE!!!

    "A treasure not to be missed." —Scoop

    The first volume of Alex Raymond's modernist classic reproduces, from syndicate proof sheets, every strip from the beginning, March 4, 1946, through December 4, 1948. Co-written with Ward Greene, the stories sometimes address then-contemporary issues, including trafficking in black market babies and the attempt to limit the proliferation of atomic and biological weapons. But the real star is Raymond's lush and incomparable brushwork.

    Oversized 11" x 10" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 320 pp., $49.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-60010-484-8.

    Rip Kirby Vol. 2: 1948-1951

    by Alex Raymond,
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney, Essay by Brian Walker Introduction by Howard Chaykin.

    The second volume of Alex Raymond's modernist classic reproduces, from syndicate proof sheets, every strip from December 6, 1948 through September 22, 1951.

    Oversized 11" x 10" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 320 pp., $49.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-60010-582-1.

    Rip Kirby Vol. 3: 1951-1954

    by Alex Raymond
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney, Essay by Brian Walker.

    The third volume of Alex Raymond's modernist classic reproduces every strip from September 24, 1951 through April 17, 1954. Raymond hits his post-War stride with lush and incomparable brushwork that made every other comics artist take notice. Co-written with Ward Greene and Fred Dickenson.

    Oversized 11" x 10" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 304 pp., $49.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-60010-785-6.

     

    Rip Kirby Vol. 4: 1954-1956

    by Alex Raymond
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney, Essay by Brian Walker.

    The fourth and final volume of Alex Raymond's modernist classic reproduces every strip from April 19, 1954 through September 29, 1956. The forty-six-year-old Raymond's tragic death in the prime of his life caught the syndicate in mid-story. This book also contains the conclusion to Raymond's ultimate story, drawn by John Prentice, from October 1 throuigh October 20, 1956.

    Oversized 11" x 10" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 280 pp., $49.99.
    ISBN: 978-1-60010-989-8.

     

    Rip Kirby Vol. 5: 1956-1959

    by John Prentice and Fred Dickenson
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney, Essay by Brian Walker.

    The fifth volume of  Rip Kirby  features the incredible art of John Prentice, who picked up the pen and ink duties after Alex Raymond's death and continued drawing the strip for decades. Prentice received three Reuben Awards for the series, in 1966, 1967, and 1986. Fred Dickenson, who had been writing the strip with Raymond, keeps the continuity going for Prentice's exquisite art. The strips are reproduced from the original King Features Syndicate proofs, insuring that every daily will look even better than when they were first published in newspapers over fifty years ago. Containing more than 800 comics, every one from October 22, 1956 to June 6, 1959.

    Oversized 11" x 10" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 296 pp., $49.99.

     

    Rip Kirby Vol. 6: 1959-1962

    by John Prentice and Fred Dickenson
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney, Essay by Brian Walker.

    In this sixth volume,  Rip Kirby goes from Mid-Century Cool to the Swinging Early Sixties as artist John Prentice has made the strip completely his own. He would soon receive the National Cartoonist Society award for "Best Story Strip Cartoonist" in 1966 and 1967. Fred Dickenson, who had been writing the strip with series originator Alex Raymond, keeps the continuity going for Prentice's exquisite art. The strips are reproduced from the original King Features Syndicate proofs, insuring that every daily will look even better than when they were first published in newspapers over fifty years ago. Containing more than 800 comics, every one from June 8, 1959 to February 10, 1962.

    Oversized 11" x 10" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 288 pp., $49.99, ISBN: 978-1-61377-710-7.

     

    New Release

    Rip Kirby Vol. 7: 1962-1964

    by John Prentice and Fred Dickenson
    Edited & Designed by Dean Mullaney, Essay by Brian Walker.

    In this seventh volume, Al Williamson takes on a larger role as John Prentice’s assistant, and Prentice fully hits his stride. Fred Dickenson continues to write Rip Kirby’s adventures. Rip Kirby, the suave gentleman detective is the right man for his times as then-current 1960s culture reflects a new fascination with sophisticated stories featuring James Bond and other agents, both secret and otherwise. The strips are reproduced from the original King Features Syndicate proofs, insuring that every daily will look even better than when they were first published in newspapers over fifty years ago. Containing nine complete stories in more than 800 sequential comics from February 12, 1962 to October 10, 1964.

    Oversized 11" x 10" hardcover-with-dustjacket, 296 pp., $49.99. ISBN: 978-1-63140-034-6

     

Alex Raymond

Alex Raymond (1909-1956) is regarded, with Milton Caniff and Hal Foster, as one of the three giants of newspaper adventure strip artists. Raymond apprenticed with Chic Young on Blondie, and Lymon Young on Tim Tyler's Luck. The year 1934 was a major turning point in his career: he illustrated X-9, a new detective comic strip written by Dashiell Hammett, and then created Flash Gordon and Jungle Jim. Rip Kirby, created in 1946, signaled a grand departure, both thematically and artistically, from the science fiction classic. He promulgated a new art style—one of cinematic photo-realism—that influenced such artists as Stan Drake, Leonard Starr, Al Williamson, and Neal Adams.

JohnPrentice

John Prentice was born in Whitney, Texas in 1920. In 1939 he joined the Navy, survived the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, served on two destroyers in eight combat campaigns, and was honorably discharged in 1945. After the war he enrolled in the Art Institute of Pittsburgh and then moved to New York, where he eventually became a successful freelancer, illustrating paperback book covers, comic books for the Joe Simon/Jack Kirby studio, DC Comics, and others, as well as being a regular contributor to major magazines before taking over Rip Kirby.

 

"The key appeal of Rip Kirby is, of course, the storytelling and art. Raymond's handling of character nuance in particular is first-rate.... IDW Publishing and editor Dean Mullaney deserve an enormous amount of credit for bringing this material back into print. And on such a gargantuan scale! This slab of a book contains well over 800 daily strips, and if one enjoys the dramatic-continuity newspaper comics of the Forties and Fifties, it's an absolute feast. Before now, one largely had to take on faith the view that Raymond's dramatic storytelling skills were almost on the level of his illustrative prowess. The evidence is at last back with us, and it doesn't disappoint."
-Pol Culture